General objectives that guide the activities and relationships of one state in its interactions with other states.

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Tips on Adjusting to Contact Lenses from a Long-Time Lens Wearer

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Wearing contact lenses will become as routine as brushing your teeth in time. Adjusting to contact lenses for some people is simple, but when I started wearing them I found it took a little getting used to. There were new routines to follow, concerns about infection, and perhaps most of all, the strange feeling of putting something in my eye and leaving it there all day.

At first, my feelings when adjusting to contact lenses actually felt a little like claustrophobia, I kept getting this urge to just take them out! But I’m glad that I didn’t since I have been wearing contact lenses for almost two decades now.

The most important thing to remember about contact lenses is that you will most likely get used to them, and even forget that you’re wearing them. It just takes time. On the other hand, though, if they feel irritating or otherwise uncomfortable, that’s not something you should get used to! Check with your eye care professional right away to prevent any eye problems, and also for your peace of mind.

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Unless you have lenses that are designed to be worn for extended periods of time, stick to the prescribed schedule of wear and care for the lenses. When you’re adjusting to contact lenses you may pay most of your attention to how you feel, but infection and serious eye problems are prevented by following directions. Use the cleaning materials and procedures that have been recommended, and think about how a surgeon scrubs for operation – it’s a lot easier than recovering from any consequences of not doing it well.

If you’re adjusting to contact lenses from eyeglasses, you’ll have a pleasant surprise in store – you’ll have peripheral vision! That means you can drive more easily, catch people sneaking up on you (or your kids in the cookie jar) and the world will feel more ‘around’ you. It takes a little getting used to.

You’ll also have to adjust to the fact that your glasses don’t need pushing up on your nose, won’t be in the way when you’re working under the car or in tight spaces, and won’t need cleaning or have glare problems. On the other hand, you won’t have glasses to protect you, so be careful and wear eye protection when necessary, especially if you are used to assuming your glasses will protect you.

Chemicals are a special case with contacts because the contact lens will hold the chemicals right next to your eye like a sponge. Ask your doctor what to do if something gets in your eye with your type of lens, and learn any special procedures if you work with chemicals at your job.

Img source: boydeyes.com

If you haven’t worn any kind of corrective lenses before, you’ll mostly just enjoy better vision than before. I have found that the change in my eye’s focusing when I change my prescription can cause a little discomfort or headache, but it doesn’t last long, maybe a day at most.

Contact lens wearers have to learn to adjust many of their daily routines to accommodate the lenses. Sports, swimming, unexpected overnight stays at the airport or elsewhere can all raise challenges. Water in the eyes from swimming or sweat can contaminate the lenses as well as cause them to slip out. Good luck finding them if they do! Carrying a small storage kit can be handy for unexpected situations where you have to remove them, whether overnight or just because they feel uncomfortable.

Adjusting to contact lenses is a balance between making sure that your eyes are comfortable and safe, and getting through that initial period where they don’t feel quite right. Since you only have one pair of eyes, don’t worry about being a little on the cautious side, your doctor will be glad you did also! Learn about how to adapt your activities and prepare for unexpected situations, and you’ll have great vision without having to worry about where you left or glasses, or getting a new pair when styles change! For any other information about contact lenses, go to this website.



Peter is a freelance writer with more than eight years of experience covering topics in politics. He was one of the guys that were here when the foreignpolicyi.org started.

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