General objectives that guide the activities and relationships of one state in its interactions with other states.

Source:nationalvanguard.org

Paula Hitler – What She Said About Her Brother Adolf Hitler

in History by

On June 1st, 1960, elderly Paula Wolf passed away in her two-room apartment in a little German town of Berchtesgaden. Frau Wolf worked as a secretary for the most of her life, and there was nothing remarkable about her, except the fact that she was surrounded by former Nazi and SS members, who took care of her for the last eight years of her life. For Frau Wolf was actually Paula Hitler, the last living immediate relative of Adolf Hitler.

Alois Hitler Sr. married Klara Pölzl, his third and final wife, on January 7th, 1885. Faithfull to his character, after a modest lunch for a few guests, Alois went to work for the rest of the day, leaving Klara to take care of his two children from his second marriage, Alois Jr., and Angela. Soon, Clara added three of her own children to the bunch, Adolf (born 1889), Edmund (born 1893), and Paula (born 1896). Edmund died of measles in 1900, when he was just seven.

When Paula was six, Alois Hitler Sr. died while having his usual morning glass of wine in his favorite tavern. Five years later, she lost her mother as well. Since Alois Sr. spend his entire career working in the customs office, Austrian government awarded small pensions to both Adolf and Paula. Later, Adolf renounced his pension, signing it over to Paula.

Source:hitlerschildren.com

Paula Hitler’s first job after the war was as a housekeeper at a dormitory for Jewish university students in Vienna. She changed careers later and became a secretary. She saw her brother only once during the 1920s and described the meeting as if he had “fallen from heaven.” He was quickly gaining notoriety and his reputation did have a negative effect on Paula’s life. She lost her job at a Viennese insurance company in 1930, when her bosses, despite her using the Alois Sr.’s original surname Hiedler, discovered she was Adolf’s sister. Since then she was receiving financial aid from her brother until his death and the collapse of the Third Reich in 1945. Although he was helping both of his sisters after his climb to power, Adolf didn’t think much of either Angela or Paula, calling them stupid geese. He even declined Paula’s request to marry Dr. Erwin Jekelius, an Austrian doctor. Instead, he had him arrested and sent to the East front, where he was captured. Dr. Jekelius died in Soviet prisoners of war camp in 1947.

Source:thegloor.com

After the war, Paula Hitler was arrested by the Allies and interrogated by the United States military intelligence. One of the notes from the interrogation states that agents thought she looked a lot like her older brother. She couldn’t believe that her beloved Adi was responsible for Holocaust and said that she only got to meet Eva Braun once.

When she was released, Paula returned to Vienna, living from her savings. But in 1952, she transferred to a modest apartment in Berchtesgaden, where several former Nazi and SS members flocked to her. In all her interviews she never talked about politics, thus avoiding to criticize her brother.

Source: ww2gravestone.com



As one of the founders of foreignpolicyi.org Knjaz Milos tries to bring all the latest news regarding politics. He loves history and is passionate about writing. contact: carsoidoffice[at]gmail.com

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